Copy of Copy of Ebola: Advice for travellers

Dec 15, 2020 | Ebola Virus Disease | 0 comments

The Ebola outbreak is widespread in Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia, with one imported fatal case in Lagos. There has been a rapid response to this case and containment measures have been introduced with follow up of possible contacts.  Read the rest of the report …

The Ebola outbreak is widespread in Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia, with one imported fatal case in Lagos. There has been a rapid response to this case and containment measures have been introduced with follow up of possible contacts.

There are no Ebola cases in South Africa or in any other country, to date. No travel or trade restirctictions have been imposed by the WHO. Travellers to outbreak infected countries have low or very low risk of contracting Ebola given that the virus is only transmitted by close direct contact with blood, body fluid or tissue of infected patients. The virus is not airborne, and there is no risk from healthy contacts. Returning travellers who are well do not pose a risk to family and do not need to be quarantined or tested. Should a fever develop it is extremely important to exclude malaria: consult a medical practitioner and provide information regarding travel history. 

Travellers to the area, working in whatever industry must be aware of other health risks and take the necessary precautions – vaccines which will include yellow fever, personal protection; malaria chemoprophylaxis is of paramount importance and must not be ignored. Malaria, dengue fever, typhoid fever, hepatitis A, Lassa faver and tick related illnesses must be considered in the differential diagnosis of a traveller to this area who presents with a fever.

Lassa fever is well described in all three countries and Nigeria. It is transmitted from excreta from rodents where there is chronic urinary carriage of the virus and needs to be considered in the differential diagnosis in travellers with a severe febrile illness who have been to rural areas where rodents are common.

Source: NICD 

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