Malaria

The risk for malaria increases from September and September to May is considered the malaria season. Overall control initiatives have been very successful in the malaria transmission areas. Mostly falciparum malaria is seen. The risk remains low in KwaZulu-Natal and is confined to the very far northern KZN.

There is no malaria in the Drakensberg, Hhluhlwe and Umfolozi Game Parks and St Lucia areas. The risk of malaria in the Kruger National Park will increase and malaria chemoprophylaxis needs to be considered.

Mozambique has year round malaria and the risks in southern Zambia, Zimbabwe (Victoria Falls) will likewise increase.

Measures to reduce mosquito bites (the malaria mosquitoes are most active from sunset to sunrise) are essential and include application of DEET containing insect repellents to exposed areas, wearing of long pants and socks and sleeping under a mosquito net.

To view the South Africa malaria map, click here ...

Malaria Advisory for South Africa April 2017

Malaria Advisory for South Africa April 2017

Updated: 12 April 2017

Malaria risk map for South Africa 2017

The malaria risk map as released by the Department of Health.  Map produced by the Health GIS Centre, Malaria Research Unit and South African Medical Research Council. To significantly reduce your risk, take precautionary measures against mosquito bites throughout the year in ALL RISK areas. Where malaria chemoprophylaxis is indicated, mefloquine or doxycycline or atovaquone proguanil should be used.

Updated: 12 April 2017

What is malaria?

Information extracted from the Malaria - Topics in International Health CD-ROM published by the Wellcome Trust, and from a Roll Back Malaria information booklet Introduction.

Travellers guide to malaria in South Africa

We have provided a map of major cities in South Africa and the risk of malaria transmission in these cities.

Malaria Advice for Travellers in South Africa

The best prevention is personal protection against the mosquito. Malaria mosquitoes generally bite after dark, wear long sleeves and trousers in the afternoon and evening; stay in-doors if possible. Use insect repellent on exposed skin.

Malaria factsheet

Malaria is a serious, sometimes fatal, tropical disease spread by mosquito bites.  The World Health Organization estimates 3.3 billion people (half the world’s population) are at risk from malaria, with approximately 250 million cases and nearly one million deaths every year. 

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Important Notice

You are advised to visit your general practice surgery or a travel medicine clinic at least 6 weeks before you travel. However, it is never too late to seek advice.

If you have a medical condition, you are advised to discuss the suitability of the trip before you book.

 

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